History of Chase Farm

Harvesting

Getting in the harvest

Getting in the harvest

Chase Farm grew corn during and after the war. Getting in the harvest at that time was a huge task, and had to be done quickly when the weather was favourable. Friends and family were called on to help.

Tractors and trailers were becoming more common in the 1940s, replacing horse drawn carts. Chase Farm had an early Fordson tractor then, as well as horses.

Loading sheaves of corn onto carts, and building threshing ricks was a dangerous business. There were a lot of accidents on farms, with people falling off trailers.

A satisfied team relaxing after a hard morning’s work

On the way back to the barn

On the way back to the barn

The sheaves would be stacked in the barn, to wait for the steam driven threshing machine to arrive later in the year.

Building the stooks

Building the stooks

Building the stooks

The corn was cut and tied into sheaves by a machine, pulled by a horse or a tractor.

The sheaves then had to be picked up and built into stooks to dry, and to protect them from bad weather.

The hay rake

Walter Smith's daughter Megan, with the hay rake

Walter Smith's daughter Megan, with the hay rake

Chase Farm was still using horses during wartime. This is a hay rake.

The hay was cut and left to dry on the ground, then raked together and loaded onto a cart with pitchforks and taken to a haystack.

The hay was needed throughout the winter to feed the dairy cows.

Derek Dixon cutting hay from the rick to feed the cattle

Cutting hay from the rick to feed the cattle

Later, in about 1950, Chase Farm started making silage.

Today all hay is baled in the field, saving a huge amount of work.